Monday, March 5, 2012

My Experience with Gallery Glass to Paint Faux Stained Glass Windows

     Recently, I was asked to restore two faux stained glass windows for my local Renaissance Faire group, the only product I thought could work is Plaid's Gallery Glass paints.  However, I wanted to keep my options open in case there were other products available that would do a better job.
    These windows were done by some volunteers in the late seventies and early eighties. They are hung in a variety of locations at the renaissance faire site.  The windows were in dire need of some tender care.
Damaged Faux Stained Glass Window
    The paint used to create the original faux stained glass effect was in bad shape.  Here is close up of some of the damage from exposure to the sun and other elements.
close up of damage
The windows themselves are old plexiglass and have been exposed to the bad weather and extreme heat.  There are quite a bit of imperfections in the plexiglass, as well as some breakage.  The paint and faux leading were also peeling off of these pieces.  I also found that over the years, folks had dropped various wall paints on the plexiglass which damaged them even more.

     Additionally, the Tudor Roses on the second window were badly faded and some of the faux leading was peeling right off of that window.

    Since funds were extremely limited I had to find an inexpensive but effective products to fix them with.  I decided my best bet was to go to my local art supply store and Michael's to see what they had available on their shelves.  I found two products, one was  the Plaid Gallery Glass window color
and the other was Folk Art Glass Enamels.  The Michael's store had two other glass painting products but their prices were on the high side for the amount of product I would need to fix all the windows.
Folk Art Enamels for ceramics and glass painting.
Since I already had a sampling of the enamels (see above), I choose to buy some of the "Gallery Glass" products to test out.
Gallery Glass for painting on clear surfaces.

     The first test was to use the two product lines on a spare piece of plexiglass to see how the products would work on plexiglass, before I applied them to the windows.  I also did a side by side comparison of the two products so I could see how the colors would look on the plexiglass.

      On the left hand side of the plexiglass is the Folk Art Enamels products and on the right is the Gallery Glass product.  As you can see, the Gallery Glass colors look very smooth and vibrant in comparison to the Folk Art Enamels.  I think this is because the Folk art enamels are very thick and need to be applied in layers to get a similar coverage as the Gallery Glass product.  Plus, you can really see all the strokes from the paint brush on the plexiglass.  The gallery glass product was applied once and appears to be self leveling which is very helpful when you have uneven surfaces to work with. Applying the Gallery Glass product onto glass or plexiglass is so simple.  Just squeeze the product onto the surface and let it dry.

 Since, the plexiglass on the windows is quite old and pitted, ease of application is a big plus that would be very helpful.
     The second test was to see how translucent and/or opaque each product was when holding it up to a light source.
    The first example is the "Folk Art Enamels" which I painted onto a piece of glass. I decided to test the enamels on the glass to see if that made a difference in how the paint is applied.  The enamels still showed all of the paint strokes and seem to magnify imperfections on the glass and plexiglass.
Folk Art Enamels painted on glass.
The Gallery Glass product looks great on the plexiglass and easily covers the surface imperfections (which in this case included old dried on paint, scratches, pits and more).
Gallery Glass on Plexiglass
I also think the since the Gallery Glass is so translucent it also makes the colors a bit more vibrant.
     There was quite a bit of light reflected through the window (onto the sidewalk and grass) that was painted with the Gallery Glass product.
Example of how much light and color are reflected through the window painted with Gallery Glass.
     Before I started to paint the windows, I had to clean and lightly sand the plexiglass with a special polish to fill in small cracks and scratches.  I could not remove all of the old paint and had to work around it to fix these pieces.  This took quite a bit of extra time but it left me with a better surface to paint on.
     I then decided that for this particular project that the Gallery Glass products would be the best choice for me to use.
This turned out to be a good decision because after I had painted the roses red like someone had
previously, I found out that the "Tudor Rose" was actually a combination of white and red petals. 

     This particular renaissance faire is supposed to take place during the Tudor period, so I needed to correct the color of the roses to reflect the correct time period.   I easily removed the red color and repainted the roses in the correct color combination.  Thankfully I had used the Gallery Glass product and it did peel off which gave me the opportunity to make the needed changes. Here is what it looked like, once I painted them the correct color.
A close up of the Tudor Rose.

After I finished painting the windows, I sealed the work with an appropriate UV protecting product.  The cost of using the Gallery Glass products was far more cost effective than the other glass painting products that I found at the art supply store.  Especially, since the UV protecting product alone was over $25 for a two ounce jar and it took two jars to seal both windows properly.
   I also wanted to test the Gallery Glass product on a glass to see if I got the same results as with the plexiglass. My friend had a cool doggy door that was perfect to test the product out on.
 I decided to test out the Gallery Glass leading blanks out too that I had picked up some at a local craft yard sale.

These are so easy to use and save an amazing amount of time because you do not have to wait for the faux leading liquid to dry. You just take them out of the package and apply them to a clean smooth surface.

Then I added some of the instant leading straight lines.  Then I filled in the lines with the Gallery Glass product.  Gallery Glass recently painted on glass surface is opaque until it dries.
This is how it looks once it is dry.  You can see how much more translucent it becomes.



Tips:

Folk Art Enamels on Glass
  • Gallery Glass is not permanent, so if at a later time you change your mind or need to make changes you can.
  • The Gallery Glass material is self leveling but can also be played with to create different textures on glass and plexiglass surfaces.
  • The Gallery Glass liquid leading in silver and gold had a runny texture that made it difficult to work with.  I found that using the black and painting it with outdoor metallic paint (after it had dried) worked better than trying to use the metallic colored liquid leading product.  Then I sealed it with a UV Sealant to further protect it.
  • Folk Art enamels are permanent and good for projects like drink ware (like wine glasses) and ceramics. Just be sure to paint surfaces that will not come in contact with your mouth.
  • Gallery Glass is not permanent and if the project is going to displayed outdoors, you will need a sealant to protect the project otherwise it will be affected by the weather and sun.

Folk Art Enamel on Ceramic
5.21.13:  Just a quick update, I ended up restoring six more windows for the local Renaissance Faire.  So far they have held up really well. This is the second year they have been on display at the Renaissance Faire.  During the 7 week run of faire the windows are exposed to extreme heat during the day, cold temperatures at night, sand storms, and rain.  The UV Sealant was worth the expense, because they look great.  I think it helped protect the Gallery Glass product on those windows.


For those of you who are fans of miniature and 1" scale work, I am including these photo's taken by Artist Jerry Hooker of his miniature stain glass windows that he makes using a similar product.

These particular windows are done in miniature inside of a repurposed antique victrola.


Other than the stairway spindles and one or two  of the miniature furniture pieces,


 everything else is made by Jerry Hooker. These are quite beautiful, especially

considering the amount of work it takes to create such detailed windows in this scale.

This also shows the versatility of these types of materials when applied to projects in different sizes.  Thank you to Jerry Hooker for sharing these pictures of your amazing work.


Notes:
Update (6/3/2013) For those of you who live in really extreme environments and are having problems with the Gallary Glass sticking to your glass, I found another product that might work.  I must first remind you that you can just gently peel off your Gallary Glass design, clean the window and remove any film, chemicals or dust that may be on them.  Then re-apply your finished design onto the clean surface.  I did try a different product to paint some small acrylic pieces with a product called the Klutz Press Window Art Deluxe Paint Set.    I live near the beach and have to contend with fog and really humid days.  I have had good results with both this product.  The Klutz Paint tubes are much smaller than the Plaid product, so plan accordingly.  Additionally, the Klutz Paint tubes are geared for use by children and their color pallete reflects this with some very vibrant colors.  I found their bright colors are great for floral designs.  It is pretty easy to incorporate the more neon colors into flower or bird designs to brighten them.  Plus the light shines through quite nicely with the neon collection.

Update 3/5/17:
I can not recommend the Klutz Press Window Paints anymore.  In extreme heat 105 degrees and 70% humidity, it starts to melt.  The worst part is trying to remove the Klutz Window Paints from acrylic.  The paint melted and moved around the acrylic window but would not come off the acrylic easily. I had to use various tools to try to remove it.  The Plaid Gallery Glass is so much easier to remove.








Disclosure

71 comments:

  1. Jessica McCarthyMay 6, 2012 at 11:27 AM

    I have a question for you. I am currently painting a piece of plexi with the gallery glass paints for a friend of mine who is using it as a back lit piece on a stereo system box. My problem is, once it dries I will be wrapping it and sending it to him via USPS. I am concerned that the bubble wrap will stick to it during transport and it would peel the paint off. Is there any type of sealant that would prevent the paint from sticking and peeling? any help would be very much appreciated. thank you!

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  2. Hi Jessica, I did use a "UV Sealant" for the windows that I got at Art Supply Warehouse. Just look around for sealants that work with plastic. If your piece is going to be in sunlight a lot, then check out the UV sealants at your local art store. I hope this helps.

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  3. you could also lay wax paper over the designs. We have trouble with it here in the sunny humid weather of FL!

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  4. I sent my brother a piece pf plexiglass painted for Christmas and the bubble wrap did stick to it terribly. He lives in the mountains and it had been very cold there and snowing so he just put the plastic piece (bubble wrap and all) out in the snow for an hour or so and then brought it in and it came right off the plexiglass! A persons freezer would also work. :-)

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  5. I have a wall of windows in my kitchen (about 9 feet long above the banquette) which look onto the house right next door. I hated to think of all those curtains I would have to be cleaning and replacing, etc., so I tried the Gallery Glass. They have held their color and remained consistent for over 10 years and I have never used a sealant of any kind. Here in Kansas we never know what the weather will be, but it's either too hot or too cold... so they've had a lot of abuse. Everyone who sees them have nothing but compliments. The best thing...after all these years I'm remodeling my kitchen and the windows as well. New design, new colors but I'm still using Gallery Glass, I love it!

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  6. Your taste is excellent. You have a high grade feel on your work.


    warwick auto glass

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  7. I am considering painting the sliding glass doors of my bathroom shower with a faux stained glass. I've been looking at various ways to do it, and can't think of a good one. The trouble is, I rent my apartment, and the faux finish will need to come off eventually. Elmer's glue mixed with acrylic paint peels right off, but looks dull, and basically just looked like regular paint on glass. This product, "Gallery Glass" seems to be more transparent than the glue, as well as shinier (more like real glass). And I can see that it peels off, which is good. What is your opinion? Is this product shiny and glass-like without needing a sealant? Or, having worked with the product, what is your assessment of the following idea: What if I cover the glass with Gallery Glass, entirely (no clear spaces left), then put a shiny coat sealant on it? Since the sealant is on the Gallery Glass, not on the actual shower door, do you think it would permanently adhere the Gallery Glass to the door? (Hopefully not.) Thanks for your advice!
    -Maria

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    1. Hi Maria, I would make sure to color only the outside of the shower glass. Since you are going to use it in a room that will have a lot of moisture from the shower, I would recommend you use a different product from the folks at Klutz press. I will put a link up in the post so you can see it. It works much better in humid environments. Let me know how it works for you.

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  8. I am considering using the Gallery Glass products to make a couple rows of "stained glass" diamonds across the middle of a wine glass. Of course the glasses would have to be hand washed, but do you foresee any other problems with doing this? Do the materials harden sufficiently to allow handling? Or would they have to be for display only?

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    1. Hi Adele, Gallery Glass is not created to be permanent. So if you would use it on wine glasses, they would be for display purposes only. You can find some nice glass paints from Martha Stewart that might be better for your project. Here is a link to learn more about those paints: http://bit.ly/126ijFg

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  9. I have been creating faux stained glass with Glass Gallery paints also. I have tried several other methods and paints (including regular glass paint) but I can't get that "glow" you get from the stained glass paints when light is behind it. Since Gallery Glass is not permanent, is there a way to make it permanent with some kind of clear sealant? I want to make some outdoor suncatchers. Do you have any better suggestions than the Gallery Glass? Thank you for your help!

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  10. I am applying a faux stained glass decorative window film to a mirror. Can I apply "Liquid Leading" or "Leading Blanks" to the lines on the film to make it look more like real stained glass ? If so, what product would work best ? Anybody know ?
    Thanks ! Anna

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    1. Hi Anna, it should work fine on your mirror. Both the Plaid product and the Klutz product would work on a mirror. The Klutz product is easily found on Amazon and the Plaid product can be found at your local Michaels or other large craft store.

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    2. Thanks for your response, Maria. You feel that the faux leading would work fine on my mirror BUT it would NOT be applied directly to the mirror. I will apply a decorative film over the mirror that looks like a stained glass window...then I want to put the faux leading on the surface of the film to make it look even more like real leaded stained glass. Do you think this will work for me ? I am very grateful that you are trying to help me with this project. Thank You very much ! Anna

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    3. As long as the plastic surface is clean and chemical free, it should stick. You may have to clean the surface first with rubbing alcohol (do a test corner first to make sure the plastic surface can handle the alcohol). A new package of leading blanks would have a stronger adhesive than one that has sat on a self for a year. Also, I dont think it will hold up well in extreme weather. I hope this helps.

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    4. Thanks so very much, Maria. Your advice is ve-e-ery helpful indeed...even the lady that makes the window film was UN-able to give me any advice regarding faux-leading. I will test with rubbing alcohol and clean if test patch is OK...then buy a fresh package of leading blanks. THANKS !!!

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    5. Before you spend the money on leading blanks, make sure you look carefully at the packaging to make sure they are pretty fresh.

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  11. Is there any way I can put some sort of sealant on the faux stained glass so that it becomes permanent? I have some pieces I've done I want to use outdoors as suncatchers.

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    1. Unfortantly, this products were created to be temporary. There sealants that can help them last longer but they will fade and peel off after a few years. However, it is easy to just repaint the item when that happens. I would recommend using a UV sealant to help protect your work from the sun.

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    2. For a more permanent project, consider using the Martha Stewart Glass paints. As soon as I have a break from schoool, I will post some examples of glass painted with the Martha Stewart Glass paints. The MS paints definitely do not look the same as the gallery glass but they do work for a more permanent project.

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  12. Hi Maria! this summer I recently painted an 8 foot by 4 foot window of a storefront using the gallery glass paint. due to the extreme cold that we are having some of the work is now starting to peel. Is there any way to solve this or steal it In, or make this more Permanent

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    1. You can use the Plaid Sealant but I think for exteme weather you may want to try the Klutz Product (there is a link above to find it on Amazon) instead. It seems to hold up better in extreme weather. The alternative is to peel it off a little and clean the window pane with some rubbing alcohol to remove dirt and oils and re-apply the piece back on. If the temperature is below 40 degrees, it may not stick. The purpose of this product is to be temporary which is why it peels so easily.

      I do know that there are other glass paints that are created to be more permanent. Unfortantly, even the glass paints will not work as well in extreme cold weather situations. I am in southern California and we rarely have extreme cold so I haven't had to face that problem yet with my products. I did stick a piece on some glass and put it in the freezer. That experiment showed me that the Plaid Gallery Glass would not adhere well to glass in temperatures below 40 degrees. I hope this helps. Maybe one of the readers in the colder areas of the states can give you more insight on working with Gallery Glass in cold weather.

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  13. I am giving thought to using the Gallery Glass product for a custom window I am making for a dollhouse. The window is not large at 3.25" x 4.25" and although the design is not overly complex the lead lines will have to be quite thin. The smaller parts of the design to be painted in will vary from 1/8" to 1/4". Is this doable with the Gallery Glass product. I would appreciate your comments. Thank you.

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    1. Hello, I have found that it is easier to work in small detail by transferring the Gallary Glass medium into a smaller bottle with a fine tip.

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    2. Thanks Maria, that is a good idea. I have not done this before and ordered some paints and some 1/16" lines to see how each works. I imagine that working such a small window will be tedious, but I have lots of patience. Can one post photos to you? I have built many from scratch dollhouses. Thanks for your help. Jerry

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    3. I would love to see your window pieces. If you can not post it to the blog, then send me a jpeg and I will post it.

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    4. Thanks Maria, but I do not have a clue how to post a photo to the blog or where to send you a jpeg.

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  14. Hi Maria,

    I am redoing a transom window I had previously painted (don't ask!), and I hadn't used a UV sealant before; could you tell me which sealant you used on the Faire windows, I don't remember seeing that you mentioned what kind? Also, from your review, it looks like I will go with the Gallery Glass, previously I used Delta brand of glass paint.

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    1. I would recommend Dick Blick Art Supplies or your local fine arts supply store to find a good uv sealant or varathane. I used the sealant that plaid makes but I found my leading was fading, so I bought a bottle of uv sealant from the art supply store. I used the entire bottle so I dont have it find out the name. You should not need to put it on the gallary glass itself, just the liquid leading. Also if it is a windo that gets alot of direct sunlight, then you should test out the Klutz Press window paints. They are sold as a childrens craft item, but the paints work really well and the colors do well over time. The gallary glass product is not made to be permanent, so it will fade over time. The Klutz press ones have lasted a year longer than the gallary glass ones did. I hope this helps.

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  15. has anyone found a way to "ungunk" the liquid leading when it gets thick and will not flow. I recently bought some bottles and although they were new to me, they must have been on the store shelves for a while. The leading was gunky and would not flow. any thoughts or experiences?

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    1. I haven't had that happen to me yet. However, I store mine by putting a piece of cling wrap around the inside of the bottle beneath the lid. I think that helps keep it from getting too much air.

      I would recommend contacting the folks at Plaid and see if they have a product or method to fix that problem. Or return them to the store. Again if the store does not take them back, contact Plaid. The product should not age that quickly on a store shelf.

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  16. Thanks for the info i learn a lot about designing a aglass

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  17. Gorgeous, stained glass makes such a lovely light effect!

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  18. I used Gallery Glass years ago and found that the Crystal Clear would turn white on a cold window until the weather warmed up. Do you know if it still has the same problem or maybe the formula has changed? Thanks.

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    1. It depends on how cold it gets. I live in Sunny California where the lowest temperature is 40 degrees. I think if the weather dips below that, then you would get the cloudiness in the product. I did a window for the local Ren Faire and they had a night that dipped below 35 degrees and the paint was cloudy the next day. My paints for that window were purchased in 2012 so my results may differ with yours (if yours were purchased recently).

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  19. This short article posted only at the web site is truly good.grout sealing

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  20. I would like to cover a green and make it more to a black tone. What are your thoughts

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    1. You will need to look at what colors are available by Plaid or Klutz Press. The blacks are usually reserved for the faux leading but they may have come out with new dark colors that will work for you.

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  21. I would like to cover green and get black.what are your thoughts

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  22. I painted GG directly onto a couple windows over 20 years ago. Now that my girls are grown and gone, I want to repurpose the room. I hadn't heard of UV sealer and now I can't get these paintings (a pattern included in the kit, an original horse head, as well as a ballerina) to come off. I'm sure that the sun shining directly on them for years has caused this problem. I've tried using a razor blade to score the different lead areas without luck. Is there a product that I can buy to remove them without harming the windows?

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    1. I used a razor blade and Dawn soap to remove the stuff of the windows for the Renaissance Faire. However, I can't recommend that because it may scratch your windows or you could get cut from the blade. I would recommend contacting the manufacturer to see if they have a product that will remove it without harming your windows.

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    2. Lorraine, my old GG books say that in this situation try spraying them with windex to soften and break down the old paint. I imagine the longer you can keep them moist with the windex the better. You could also try a blowdryer. The heat may soften them enough to scrape it off.

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  23. So many gorgeous picks here! It's amazing how many ways there are to repurpose or salvage old doors. french doors las vegas also provides you good information about doors and glass cut out.

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  24. This is a super-helpful blog post. I'm working on a temporary window project for Halloween and it was really helpful to read about your experiences.

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    1. Thank you! I would love to see how your Halloween project comes out.

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  25. Hello Maria, I have a Cathedral church window to paint with gallery glass window colors, how long would they last on humid weather or tropical weather. Also can u name me a UV sealant that will help protect it and make it last? Thank you. Please respond ASAP.
    Regards Ranya

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  26. Hello Maria, I have a Cathedral church window to design with Gallery glass window color, How long does it last on tropical humid place? Also can u give me the name of the UV sealant to use on them to protect them? Please respond as soon as u can. Desperately need your advice
    Thank you...

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  27. Hi Randa, it will take longer to dry in Humidity. If it is not in direct sunlight, then the colors will not fade as fast as if you put it in direct sunlight. I have found that I have to repaint my windows every 2 to 3 years, depending on where it is in my house. A church window facing morning sun will last longer than one that is exposed to afternoon sun. Unfortantly I don't live in a tropical climate (it is pretty dry in Sunny California) so I can not give you any advice on how long it will last in those condition. Gallery glass is not permanent, it is a temporary decoration. I think that Plaid now carries a UV Sealant for the glass. You may want to check out their website to see. If you are located in the US, then go to an art store or to the Dick Blick on line store to see what products they have available to protect your work. I just used a museum quality sealant but even with that I still had to repaint after two years of direct sunlight. I hope this helps.

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  28. Hi Maria, I am looking to paint poinsettias on empty Starbucks Frappuccino bottles as a vase art project for my English Language Learners. In December, we read The Legend of the Poinsettia, and I want to make a related project with students and parents. I would have limited time since this would be a parent involvement activity. I am thinking that possibly the students could use Sharpies to draw the flower lines, since the leading would be too difficult and take too long to dry. Since I have over 100 students, I would have to use the less expensive Folk Enamel provided that it is safe for the students to use. After the paint dries, the black lines would probably have to be redrawn. Of course I plan to try making a sample soon, but I was wondering if you could give me any input or if you even think this is a feasible project. Perhaps you might have a better idea for creating a poinsettia on the glass bottle. Thanks!

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    1. HI Jeanne,
      I have never used sharpies on glass bottles before so I do not know how long they would last. I do know that sharpies come in some pretty fun colors so if you have them you should do a test on a bottle and see how it works. I would first clean the bottle well and then use an alcohol swab to remove any oils off the surface of the bottle. This will give you the best possible result. I would not recommend having a child do that but the adults should be able to handle that simple process. (Always you care when using any chemicals and explain how to use it safely to your students)

      Gallery glass is not expensive, however, for that size of a project it easily could be. You may want to check out Plaids glass paints and see if those met your needs better. You can find them at Michaels and Hobby Lobby. I recommend checking the manufacturers suggestions for heat setting the paints before you buy.

      Otherwise, have you thought about decoupage? You could cut red tissue into the shape of a poinsettia and then have the students decoupage it onto the glass. Here is link to a blog post that gives you an idea of what that would look like: http://www.obsessedwithpaperart.com/2012/04/decoupaged-stained-glass-french-doors.html
      I hope this helps.

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    2. Maria, what a wonderful suggestion! I have been wanting to try decoupage, and this would be so much easier since I would only need tissue paper, scissors, and Mod Podge. With coupons and my teacher discount, this might be less expensive as well. It would also be easier to transport than a painted bottle. Thank you for responding so quickly! Blessings to you! Jeanne

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    3. Glad I could offer some alternative ideas.

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  29. Have you ever used these paints on a vertical surface? I am wanting to paint a side light next to a door but I am afraid the paint will run down the glass before it can set up. Have you attempted this? If so, how did it go or what did you do to prevent "run" marks etc. Thanks

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    1. The gallery glass paints are gels, so they do not come out of the squeeze bottle quickly (unless you apply a lot of force). If you buy the larger bottles, I would squeeze some onto a plate and use a plastic pallet knife to paint vertically. Otherwise, using the smaller squeeze bottle and being careful should let you paint vertically. I would probably try it with only one bottle, that way you don't have to return a lot of bottles to the craft store to see if that will work for you. Additionally, there is a product by Klutz Press that I prefer to use when working with a vertical surface. It is a bit more expensive (when you compare the size of the bottles to the Plaid product) but so much easier to use. Here is a quick link: http://amzn.to/20veZkH . Just copy and paste and check it out. The colors are great and take longer to fade than the gallery glass product does.

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    2. Maria, thanks for your reply. I have another question. I am not finding leading blanks at my local craft stores and I am not much into buying things online. Can I use plexiglass? My craft store had some very thin plexi in sheets large enough for my project but I don't know if the gallery glass will peel off of it easily? I want to make this project removable and not permanent to the glass too. DO you know if it is easy to remove and re-install in a different location? I can't work on site so I am going to have to work in the horizontal and have it all be a cling. I am also fearful of the placement on the window with such a big area. Each window is 10 1/2x 14 1/2. Any techniques for the placement of the cling? Thanks again!

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    3. The "Friends of Faire" window is made of plexiglass. It has held up for three years without any problems. The stuff will stick to it and is a lot harder to remove than painting on glass. So if you decide you don't like your design, remove it immediately.

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    4. Maria,
      I am confused. I want to make the clings on it, remove it and put in on the vertical window. If I allow it to cure on the plexiglass do you think I will have problems getting it off?

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    5. Maria do you think I can complete the design on the plexiglass, let it cure and then take it off? Am I correct that cure time is 10 to 12 days? Is there a good way to store a design when it's not on the window? Thanks!!

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    6. If your goal is to make repositionable clings, then you should create them on the special plastic sheets created by the manufacturer of Gallery Glass for that specific purpose. My experience is that the Gallery Glass clings a little too well to plexiglass. I can remove it easily from glass but not from plexiglass.

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    7. For Marsha: No, you cannot put it on plexiglass if your plan is to peel and remove it to make a cling. Its permanent on plexi. Your could buy a roll of (good quality) clear, smooth window cling film and paint on that. Then you could remove it anytime you wish. Or, you can get a sheet of plexi from a hardware or plastic store, get it cut slightly smaller than the window you want to put it in. Paint that, and then place that painted sheet of plexi in the window. hope this helps.. :-)

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    8. If clings are your goal and you can"t get GG leading blanks, you can use glass. Remove the glass from an 8x10, 11x14, etc, picture frame and use that. Or, you can use clear page protector sleeves (test by doing a small dab of paint, let dry, then peel, to be sure). Ive used both and they work well for me. You can buy frames and page protector sleeves cheap from the dollar store. Or even Walmart.

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    9. I would recommend making the designs on glass or the specialty plastic sold by plaid. These are the best ways to store them and to be able to reuse them. The Gallery glass adheres almost permanently onto plexiglass, so your designs could be ruined if you try to remove them. I store mine on the specialty plastic sheeting on a self in my cupboard. I can easily remove them and get them to stick to a clean window (make sure the glass is oil and dirt free). Then remove them to store later. I hope this helps.

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  30. Thanks for the feedback! I've decided to paint on the film that comes on the plexiglass. I did a test run and the film came off the plexiglass fine with the design intact. It's currently on a window and seems to be staying ok. I may at some point attempt to peel the design from the film. I've been waiting to make sure it's nice and dry. Of course I can only use the plexiglass twice but for the project I'm working on now, the plexiglass will be given to the person for transport to a future location anyway.

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  31. Maria, I've hit a snag! I did a test pallette of all my colors before starting my project but now that I am done, I don't like the end product. Have you ever put on a second layer of paint to make the color darker? Thanks! Marsha

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    1. Yes I have. I usually allow 24 hours between layers so that paint has a chance to dry. Also, I have mixed the colors together to create other colors.

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  32. Thanks for sharing your experience(s). Do you know if it is safe to burn votive candles in glass candle holders painted with Gallery Glass? I can't seem to find an answer on the Plaid website.
    Thanks!! -- Molly

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    1. No it is not a good idea. I did that once and the gallery glass had a weird reaction. I do use the fake votives that flicker like a candle but are battery operated. They work well and do not give off the kind of heat that a votive would.

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  33. Do you use a sealant over a vertical piece?

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    1. I have a spray sealant that I bought a few years ago from Plaid that I use. However, if the piece is going in the sun, I use an Artist Quality UV Sealant that is very carefully brushed on and allowed to cure for a few days before I hang up the piece.

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  34. Hi Maria
    I am envisioning making glass panels for an out door shower. Since it will be outside and I want to paint it so you can only see shadows through it, what product wood you suggest I was. The shower will be subject to temperatures from 10 degrees to 90 degrees
    Thank you for your thoughts
    Jim A

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    1. Gallery Glass is not permanent,so if you envision yourself wanting to change out the design a lot then it might work for you. But since your area gets really cold, this could cause the design to actually peel, crack or discolor. I would talk to someone at Dick Blick Art (http://www.dickblick.com/categories/glassdecoration/) and ask them about their glass paints. There have been a lot of improvements in glass paints and they may carry one that will work with the extreme temperatures that your project will be subjected too.

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